The prevalence of fecal colonization of enterococci, the resistance of the isolates to ampicillin, vancomycin, and high-level aminoglycosides, and the clonal relationship among isolates


Kuzucu C., Cizmeci Z., Durmaz R., Durmaz E., Ozerol I.

MICROBIAL DRUG RESISTANCE, cilt.11, ss.159-164, 2005 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 11 Konu: 2
  • Basım Tarihi: 2005
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1089/mdr.2005.11.159
  • Dergi Adı: MICROBIAL DRUG RESISTANCE
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.159-164

Özet

The gastrointestinal tract carriage of enterococci was searched in 150 hospitalized patients and 100 outpatients, and clonal relatedness of the isolates and their resistance to ampicillin, vancomycin, and high-level streptomycin and gentamicin were investigated. A stool sample or rectal swab collected from each patient was inoculated into appropriate media within an hour. Enterococcus species were identified by using conventional biochemical tests, API-20 Strep assay, and BBL crystal kit. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect vanA and vanB genes. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and arbitrarily primed-polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR) methods were used for molecular typing of the strains. Enterococci were isolated from 90 (60%) of the specimens collected from 150 inpatients. Of these 90 isolates, 37 (41%) had high-level gentamicin resistance, 36 (40%) had high-level streptomycin resistance, and 50 (55.6%) had ampicillin resistance. Fecal colonization was found in 30% of the outpatients. Resistances to ampicillin, high-level streptomycin, and gentamicin were 13%, 10%, and 3%, in these patients' isolates, respectively. No vancomycin-resistant enterococci were detected by both agar diffusion and PCR assays in our study. Both typing procedures were applied on 78 Enterococcus strains isolated from inpatients. AP-PCR typing showed that 30 (50.8%) of the 59 E. faecium and 5 (50%) of the 10 E. faecalis strains were clonally related. These values were found to be 12 (20.3%) and two (20%) by PFGE, respectively. The typing procedures did not find any clustered strains in the six E. durans and three E. avium isolates. Neither PFGE nor AP-PCR result was significantly different among the sensitive and resistant strains. Our results indicate that the high prevalence of colonization with ampicillin and high-level aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci is an important problem in our medical center. The high clonal diversity among the isolates indicates limited spread of antibiotic-resistant strains between patients.