Is cerebral spinal fluid flow associated with body mass index and head circumference in healthy children? A phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging study


Demirtas G., SIĞIRCI A. , Ozturk M., GÖRKEM S. B. , Kilic B., GÜNGÖR S.

EGYPTIAN JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE, cilt.51, 2020 (ESCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 51 Konu: 1
  • Basım Tarihi: 2020
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1186/s43055-020-00227-w
  • Dergi Adı: EGYPTIAN JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE

Özet

Background The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between age, gender, body mass index (BMI), and head circumference (HC) and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) flow dynamics in the pediatric population. The prospective study included a total of 137 participants, 75 boys and 62 girls, ranging in age from 2 to 204 months. Quantitative evaluation of CSF flow was made by using phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) in the axial plane at the level of the aqueductus cerebri. Flow dynamics were recorded as peak and mean velocity (cm/s); cranial, caudal, and net volume (ml); and aqueductus cerebri area (mm(2)). Correlation between baseline descriptive parameters, including age, gender, BMI, and HC, and the aforementioned CSF flow dynamics were investigated. Results The net volume was significantly lower in girls (p= 0.002). There was no association between age and aqueduct area, mean velocity, and cranial volume. The peak velocity was remarkably higher in children (p= 0.03), whereas cranial and net volume were found to be lower in infants (p= 0.04 andp= 0.03, respectively). Notably, cases with HC below normal values had lower cranial, caudal, and net volume and aqueductus cerebri area (p= 0.01,p= 0.03,p= 0.03, andp= 0.04, respectively). There was no association between BMI and indicators of CSF flow dynamics in PC-MRI. Conclusion BMI and HC may be associated with CSF flow dynamics in children. A smaller HC is accompanied by a lower forward flow volume, reverse flow volume, net volume, and aqueductal diameter. These points should be remembered during the design of further trials on determinants of CSF flow in children.